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Thread: Need more chickens

  1. #21
    Wonderful, JayS, I would have written just the same things you saved me a lot of time!

    Aren’t languages wonderful?

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Zimbelstern View Post
    Wonderful, JayS, I would have written just the same things you saved me a lot of time!

    Aren’t languages wonderful?
    Thanks
    It was pre-coffee so stuck to broad strokes rather than specific details - KISS (keep it simple,stoopid) works. (Nota Bene, I don't think anyone here is stupid).

    Yes they are. They both describe and shape our thoughts and cultures.

    Recently been involved in using music and dance with dysphasia, both also culture-defined means of communication.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by JJay View Post
    Coop can also be a verb, as in "to coop something up", which means keep, or confine, or imprison something in a small space, so maybe chicken coop came from that
    lol, JJ, that is just what I needed here! but it does indeed sound convincing.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by JayS View Post
    It's more the other way round, that the English spoke Germanic until.1066 and all that. Reading Chaucer without a working knowledge of German would be (even more) difficult.
    I bet it is difficult with a well-working knowledge of German, too. *g*

    Quote Originally Posted by JayS View Post
    For example, apple used to mean fruit, same usage as 'obst', but after the Normans brought more words, pears peaches etc, it changed to mean just 'apfel'.

    English is mainly a mix of German (from the Angles and Saxons) and French (from the Normans, themselves originally Norse) with some vestiges of Norse (from Vikings), Celtic, Picts etc. Add to that mix a lot of words borrowed from colonies.
    So yes, meanings also shifted slightly as more choices became available.
    Very interesting! It's sounds like it was a miracle that ANYthing commonly understood (and learn-able) came out of it!

    Quote Originally Posted by JayS View Post
    When two words are spelled the same but pronounced differently it's a big clue that they have different origins.
    Thanks for this, too - I still wasn't aware of this, cos I wouldn't have pronounced them differently (I noticed thru your post). I pronounce them as German, which is Ko-op. So that help was missing, even with the coupe earlier (which I pronounce Coupé = Kupee, German spelling).

    Other than here, I'll stay with henhouse. *G*

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by _DD_ View Post
    I bet it is difficult with a well-working knowledge of German, too. *g*



    Very interesting! It's sounds like it was a miracle that ANYthing commonly understood (and learn-able) came out of it!



    Thanks for this, too - I still wasn't aware of this, cos I wouldn't have pronounced them differently (I noticed thru your post). I pronounce them as German, which is Ko-op. So that help was missing, even with the coupe earlier (which I pronounce Coupé = Kupee, German spelling).

    Other than here, I'll stay with henhouse. *G*
    Just done a bit of digging
    Chicken coops were originally barrel-shaped wicker baskets to transport chickens to market - hence the 'cupa' root.
    https://www.etymonline.com/word/coop

    You're right, without knowing the different pronunciations you can't tell except by context
    Reminds me of scratching my head wondering who the heck Peter Gore was and what he had to do with Kids homework - French pronunciation of Pythagoras!

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by JayS View Post

    You're right, without knowing the different pronunciations you can't tell except by context
    Reminds me of scratching my head wondering who the heck Peter Gore was and what he had to do with Kids homework - French pronunciation of Pythagoras!
    Yes, with names things can get very funny, not only with pronunciation, but also, when they‘re accustomed to the local language. I once lived in Riga for three months and went to the theatre, a drama by Iudzins Onils ... it took me quite a while to decipher that as Eugene O‘Neill

    And when I was in fifth grade (we just started learning english), we sent goods to Poland, where they had martial law at that time. We had a kind a canned meat, which was called „lunch meat“. Our teacher was dictating and a friend of mine wrote „Landschmied“ (country smith) ...

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by JayS View Post
    Just done a bit of digging
    Chicken coops were originally barrel-shaped wicker baskets to transport chickens to market - hence the 'cupa' root.
    oh, that sounds quite convincing for THIS way, too! and thx for the link! will have to "read" through the other words mentioned on the page as well

    You're right, without knowing the different pronunciations you can't tell except by context
    Reminds me of scratching my head wondering who the heck Peter Gore was and what he had to do with Kids homework - French pronunciation of Pythagoras!

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Zimbelstern View Post
    ...a drama by Iudzins Onils .....Eugene O‘Neill

    ...was called „lunch meat“. ... wrote „Landschmied“ (country smith) ...
    Mega-LOL! love such examples!

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Zimbelstern View Post
    Yes, with names things can get very funny, not only with pronunciation, but also, when they‘re accustomed to the local language. I once lived in Riga for three months and went to the theatre, a drama by Iudzins Onils ... it took me quite a while to decipher that as Eugene O‘Neill

    And when I was in fifth grade (we just started learning english), we sent goods to Poland, where they had martial law at that time. We had a kind a canned meat, which was called „lunch meat“. Our teacher was dictating and a friend of mine wrote „Landschmied“ (country smith) ...
    Lolol.
    You've started a meme with that one-have a vision of a bad-tempered lonely Landschmied posting spam everywhere : D

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by JayS View Post
    Lolol.
    You've started a meme with that one-have a vision of a bad-tempered lonely Landschmied posting spam everywhere : D
    Grins ... the only one bad tempered was the teacher, who thought my friend had been doing it on purpose

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