Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19

Thread: Language Differences

  1. #1

    Language Differences

    I was just chatting to _DD_ in another thread about playing Township in different languages and was wondering if anyone who races in a co-op which uses a language which isn't their native one (which must be a lot of players seeing as the game doesn't include that many) has ever been confused by something which was written in chat, or have there been any funny misunderstandings due to language differences? Are there some items/products which have completely different names in your language, or are translated strangely? Or do you use other names for products in your mind, rather than the ones used in the game?

    For example, I speak British English and a lot of the products in the game have (what I guess are) American English names. I usually race solo so it doesn't matter to me, but in the past I've confused other players by saying I'm making jumpers instead of sweaters, or anoraks instead of parkas and lollies instead of popsicles. And I always bring prawns from Fisherman's Isle, never shrimp(s)

    And what are coney dogs and eskimo pies??? In British English coney is an old word for rabbit. In the French version of the game it's called "sandwich à la saucisse" or sausage sandwich, and in Spanish, hot dog with meat sauce, which probably(?) sounds like the best description. The eskimo pie I would probably call a choc ice - what do other people name it?

    Anyway, if you have any stories or questions about the game in various languages, please share - I'd love to hear them

  2. #2
    I remember when I first joined a co-op and there was quite a mix of nationalities in it, I had quite a funny encounter. I'm northern (England). Anyway I was talking to another player and I said something along the lines of 'years ago I used to spend a lot of time with my sisters bairns'. This player replied how wonderful I was, which I thought was a bit over the top.Later on I found out they looked the word bairn up and got a description that it meant heavily pregnant, lol. So they thought I had been a surrogate for my sister numerous times! Just for those who don't know I use the word bairn to describe kids/children, NOT heavily pregnant .
    Co-op name: War of the Roses / Co-op code:#WRY74Y / Platform: Kindle.
    Town name: Downton / Town Level: 135/ Friend Code: Y7UZA5 Full but happy to keep you on pending list
    .
    New to the game? Check out the New to Township section right here on the forum for useful info & tips, & Township Wiki for even more info .

  3. #3
    Lol Downton How long was it before you enlightened them? I read your post 10 minutes ago and I'm still giggling about it. I can't imagine what went through that player's mind when in reply to a question, or maybe just randomly in conversation, they thought you told them that

  4. #4
    Well when I realised what a magnificent thing they thought I had done, after recovering from the shock, I felt kinda of bad. I mean this was a few days till I clicked they thought I was more than just a nice auntie. I took maybe an hour or two before explaining, nope no child bearing,just an auntie enjoying time with her nephew & niece! .

    I am fairly sure that will be one word they never forget the meaning of, and although that co-op is long gone I tend to stick to calling bairns kids in co-op chat, ROFL .
    Co-op name: War of the Roses / Co-op code:#WRY74Y / Platform: Kindle.
    Town name: Downton / Town Level: 135/ Friend Code: Y7UZA5 Full but happy to keep you on pending list
    .
    New to the game? Check out the New to Township section right here on the forum for useful info & tips, & Township Wiki for even more info .

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Downton View Post
    I remember when I first joined a co-op and there was quite a mix of nationalities in it, I had quite a funny encounter. I'm northern (England). Anyway I was talking to another player and I said something along the lines of 'years ago I used to spend a lot of time with my sisters bairns'. This player replied how wonderful I was, which I thought was a bit over the top.Later on I found out they looked the word bairn up and got a description that it meant heavily pregnant, lol. So they thought I had been a surrogate for my sister numerous times! Just for those who don't know I use the word bairn to describe kids/children, NOT heavily pregnant .
    Heaven only knows what they'd have thought had you added quines and lunes to the mix.
    Incidentally, quine is a completed line at bingo in France, lune is moon. A house full?

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by JayS View Post
    Heaven only knows what they'd have thought had you added quines and lunes to the mix.
    Incidentally, quine is a completed line at bingo in France, lune is moon. A house full?
    Lol JayS!
    Co-op name: War of the Roses / Co-op code:#WRY74Y / Platform: Kindle.
    Town name: Downton / Town Level: 135/ Friend Code: Y7UZA5 Full but happy to keep you on pending list
    .
    New to the game? Check out the New to Township section right here on the forum for useful info & tips, & Township Wiki for even more info .

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by JayS View Post
    Heaven only knows what they'd have thought had you added quines and lunes to the mix.
    as before, if you bring in such words, you need to give an explanation at least No giggling between (UK) experts only, pls.

    Never heard of quines and lunes (nor bairns, btw - what is the difference to using children?) - I found quines in ONE online dictionary as "girl", so, what is lune - a boy?
    and language is rich, of course but is a hint possible, when does one use which? are they just synonyms, like Junge and Bub in German? (can't think of something similar for Mädchen and Kinder)

  8. #8
    Moderator Nevada's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Southeast England, UK
    Posts
    2,081
    Bairns is just basically the Scottish/Celtic word for child/children.

    “Look at the wee bairns playing” is “Look at the small/little children playing”.

    No difference to us using children, Celts using bairn, and you using kinder. Although Scotland, Northern Ireland, and Wales are all part of the UK, and speak English, they do also have their own languages and although they’re not as much used anymore, they have words that stick to this day.
    IMPORTANT: As a Township moderator, I only have power to maintain its forum.
    - Township Support.
    - Before posting a question, please make use of:
    Township Wiki,
    • the stickies on top of each sub-forum,
    • the search function to see previous posts.

    Leader of Franklin's Co-op. #FRERU5

    ”What if this storm ends, and leaves us nothing,
    Except a memory; a distant echo”.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Nevada View Post
    Bairns is just basically the Scottish/Celtic word for child/children.
    But it is used regularly by us Northerners as well, not just Scottish/Celtic. The author Catherine Cookson for example uses it a lot in her books .

    ETA I used her as an example as she grew up in Jarrow,Durham and was born at Tyne Docks, South Shields.
    Last edited by Downton; 05-20-2019 at 08:31 AM.
    Co-op name: War of the Roses / Co-op code:#WRY74Y / Platform: Kindle.
    Town name: Downton / Town Level: 135/ Friend Code: Y7UZA5 Full but happy to keep you on pending list
    .
    New to the game? Check out the New to Township section right here on the forum for useful info & tips, & Township Wiki for even more info .

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Nevada View Post
    Bairns is just basically the Scottish/Celtic word for child/children.
    ah right! now that you mention it, I remember I had seen "Scot." somewhere (where I found it at all).
    Thanks, Nevada and thanks, Downton (for earlier explanation)

    “Look at the wee bairns playing” is “Look at the small/little children playing”.
    That's a good example sentence I can show you the example sentence from Google translate (which offers "bairns" as German translation for "bairns", just btw):

    We used to mix it with that Ministry of Food orange juice the bairns were issued around the 1950s.
    erm... wot?



    And nobody answers for quines and lunes?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •